RegularGeek

Where programming, the internet and social media collide.

I have talked about human filters and my plan for digital curation. These items are the fruits of those ideas, the items I deemed worthy from my daily reading. These items are a combination of tech business news, development news and programming tools and techniques. You will note that some of the formatting has changed, and that is due to the change in my process. Formatting, and the information presented, is likely to change a bit as I develop my new process.

I hope you enjoy today’s items, and please participate in the discussions on those sites.

In part 1 of the programming language job trends, we reviewed JavaC++C#Objective C, and Visual Basic. In today’s installment, we review trends for PHPPythonJavaScriptRuby, and PERL. Watch for part 3 in the next few days, where we will look at some emerging languages and others gaining steam.

First, let’s look at the trends from Indeed.com:

Indeed Job Trends - August 2014

Much like the languages in part 1, there is a general downward trend for about 2 years. JavaScript still leads comfortably with Python demand staying almost flat during the past two years. PERL has been in a long decline since 2010, but still stays above PHP and Ruby. PHP had stayed flat for a while, but the past year has not been kind, with a more significant downward trend. Ruby trails, but like Python, has been almost flat for close to three years and is closing the gap with PHP and PERL. The stability of the Python and Ruby trends is probably due to their growth in non-startup environments.

Much like part 1 of the job trends, the SimplyHired trends are mostly unusable. The data is definitely close to current, but wild swings in demand show me that I cannot trust the data. I will review SimplyHired again in the next installment.

Lastly, we look at the relative growth trends from Indeed.com:

Indeed Relative Growth - August 2014

Given what the job demand graph shows, it seems surprising that the Ruby growth would outpace all of the others so dramatically. However, due to the length of time in these charts, where Ruby did not have much demand in 2006, the growth is a little misleading. When you look at the remaining languages, Python has a clear lead on the others, hovering at 500% for the past three years. PHP and Javascript come next, but still below 100% growth. PERL lags the group, near -50% growth.

The overall demand trend is similar to the trends in part 1, though these languages show a little more stability. The stability of Ruby and Python are a bright spot in some otherwise dismal trends in Part 1 and this Part 2. For people looking to learn new languages for web development or even some scripting, PERL seems to be losing relevance. I think Python and Ruby have taken over in both of those cases. Due to the popularity of Web CMS systems like WordPress, PHP demand may decline but will stick around for a long time. Please visit the blog in a few days when we look at some relatively newer languages to see if the trends remain the same.

I have talked about human filters and my plan for digital curation. These items are the fruits of those ideas, the items I deemed worthy from my daily reading. These items are a combination of tech business news, development news and programming tools and techniques. You will note that some of the formatting has changed, and that is due to the change in my process. Formatting, and the information presented, is likely to change a bit as I develop my new process.

I hope you enjoy today’s items, and please participate in the discussions on those sites.

It is time for the August edition of the programming language job trends! The response to the language list changes was definitely positive, so things will be stable for this edition. In Part 1, we look at JavaC++C#Objective C, and Visual Basic. I did look at the trends for Swift, but the demand is not high enough yet. Part 2 (PHP, Python, JavaScript, and others) and Part 3 (Erlang, Groovy, Scala, and others) of the job trends will be posted in the next few days as well.

First, we look at the job trends from Indeed.com:

Indeed Job Trends - August 2014

As you can see, there is a definite negative trend over the past three years. Java continues to lead, but its demand is less than half of what it was at its peak in 2009. C++ and C# are following the same trend since 2010, which is a steady decline. I finally determined the appropriate search for Visual Basic, and it shows the clear decline over the entirety of the graph. In this installment, Visual Basic demand finally dips below Objective C. Interestingly, Objective C demand stays fairly flat over the past year. Given this, it makes you wonder whether mobile demand is really that high, or whether it is only replacing some of the application development.

Normally, I would look at the short term trends from SimplyHired, but the searches are not working correctly, especially for C++ and C#. As opposed to previous posts, SimplyHired’s data is much more current, but still not useful for analysis purposes.

Lastly, here is a review of the relative growth from Indeed:

 

Indeed Relative Growth - August 2014

Objective C continues to dominate the relative growth, but it still has a declining trend for over a year. The other languages in this analysis are all seeing a negative trend now, with C# just going negative in the past few months. Visual Basic is showing the largest decline, probably over 80%.

Obviously, there are a number of reasons for this type of decline among this group of languages. It is difficult to assess whether mobile development affects these trends, especially because Java and Objective C are the main languages for native Android and iOS apps. The rise of alternative languages like Scala or Clojure could be contributing to this, as well as the rise of data science and machine learning. Breadth of languages being used, including mature languages like Python and Ruby, could also be affecting these trends and we will look at these in the next few days.

I have talked about human filters and my plan for digital curation. These items are the fruits of those ideas, the items I deemed worthy from my daily reading. These items are a combination of tech business news, development news and programming tools and techniques. You will note that some of the formatting has changed, and that is due to the change in my process. Formatting, and the information presented, is likely to change a bit as I develop my new process.

I hope you enjoy today’s items, and please participate in the discussions on those sites.

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