If you only read this tech blog, then you might not have heard about the recent issues with Ethereum and the DAO. The Ethereum Blog posted about a DAO vulnerability. It ends up that the vulnerability was used to start draining ether, which led to a ton of posts about this. At Hacking, Distributed, they talk about their thoughts on the DAO hack. This is probably one of the more interesting and balanced looks at the problem. Stake Ventures has a post that discusses the potential options for recovery and how they might pierce the “Decentralized Veil” of Ethereum. The concept is discussed as a parallel to the corporate veil people talk about for some enterprises.

As always, enjoy today’s items, and please participate in the discussions on these sites.

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Some interesting acquisition news starts our week, with both items reported by VentureBeat. First, Microsoft acquires and shutters messaging startup Wand Labs. Next, Samsung buys Joyent, a cloud infrastructure company. Joyent will continue to operate as a separate company, so no major concerns there. On Digital Trends, they talk about a man who built a 100mpg engine using the concepts of a Stirling engine and newer hybrid technology. It is very cool stuff.

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It has been a while, but some security news leads our day. First, The Next Web reports on 45M passwords being stolen from over 1100 VerticalScope forums. This has the potential to bleed into another password reuse hack like we have seen lately. Sentry has an excellent post about a security incident that they had recently. As far as they know, no data has been taken, but their response and documentation of the process is fantastic. At Codelitt, we get a great post about securing ubuntu. This builds on another blogger’s “my first 5 minutes on a server” post, so make sure you read the linked posts as well.

As always, enjoy today’s items, and please participate in the discussions on these sites.

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Overall, the Apple WWDC was somewhat underwhelming. However, The Next Web reports on an interesting tidbit about Siri opening up to all third-party apps. Chef released Habitat a new open source project for automating applications. I have not dug into it yet, so I can’t comment too much, but it is good to see the operations companies trying to push automation further up the lifecycle. Ayende @ Rahien has another excellent post in the database internals series. This one is about B+Trees, and is well worth the read.

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We have a lot of interesting posts today. First, on the morning paper, we learn about identifying and quantifying architectural debt. This is one of many papers currently being highlighted that deal with some research around software engineering and code quality. At Salesforce + Open Source, we get the release of Runway, a distributed systems design tool. Distributed systems tend to be complicated beasts, so I am curious how well this really works. David Lettier gives us an excellent post about writing k-nearest neighbors from scratch.

As always, enjoy today’s items, and please participate in the discussions on these sites.

Startups, Career and Process

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