In my daily work, I use both an RDBMS and MarkLogic, an XML database. MarkLogic can be considered akin to the newer NoSQL databases, but it has the added structure of XML and standard languages in XQuery and XPath. The NoSQL databases are typically storing documents or key-value pairs, and some other things in between. Given […]

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There is an interesting discussion occurring regarding data transfer in web applications. The discussion has centered on the differences between JSON and XML in the JavaScript heavy sites. It started with Norm Walsh commenting on Twitter and Foursquare removing support for XML in their APIs. The basic idea of his post was that if you are […]

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For many years, people have been concerned with how applications were structured. This concept became very popular with the client-server applications built with tools like PowerBuilder and Visual Basic. In the late 1990’s, there was a move towards 3-tier applications (client, middleware and server) as web development first started to take hold. As developers started […]

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The Java is dead meme has resurfaced, this time the instigator is Mike Gualtieri from Forrester. Given his general premise of Java is dead for enterprise development, I find it odd that he basically starts with: Java is still a great choice for app dev teams that have developed the architecture and expertise to develop […]

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The other day I was asked how much I knew about Java garbage collection. I am not a performance guru, so I admitted that I knew very little, basically only that it works. As the conversation continued, I realized that while I did not know much about the internals of the garbage collection mechanism, I […]

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